EVALUATING TEACHERS


A major feature of BORN TO LEARN:  A TRANSACTIONAL ANALYSIS OF HUMAN LEARNING is its analysis of the significance and importance of classroom layouts, teaching methods, and testing methods used by teachers of all kinds in all environments, parents in homes, teachers in schools, managers in businesses, Sunday School teachers in churches, and others.

If you are someone with the responsibility of teaching others—a parent, a school teacher, a manager, a preacher, a leader of a civic club, a fraternity or sorority, or some sort of military organization—you should read this book.

Why?

Because it might help you do a better job of teaching yourself and others and gain more satisfaction from the process.

The most important lessons in life are not lessons memorized in school; they are messages learned about how to live life so as to enjoy life.

The more you can teach people, your children, perhaps, how to do this the more successful you will be as a teacher.  

Born to Learn points out an obvious fact:  we are all born to learn.  And we will learn, no matter how good or poor our teachers are or what we learn.  The question is, what will the learning cause us to do?  

Born to Learn is based on clinical observations and research conducted by Eric Berne, MD, the founder of transactional analysis, a psychiatrist, and millions of people have used his findings since the early 1960s to help themselves and others learn better messages for getting on with the business of surviving and winning in the world, often under unfair and treacherous conditions.

To learn how to teach people, including yourself, better messages for getting on in the world click here. 

POSTSCRIPT


I (Richard) wrote and published a short piece I called Appendix I at the back of Born to Learn recommending readers read our (Stapleton & Murkison) article "Optimizing the Fairness of Student Evaluations:  A Study of Correlations Between Instructor Excellence, Study Production, Learning Production, and Expected Grades," published in the Journal of Management Education in 2001 by the Organizational Behavior Teaching Society.  The JME is printed and published by Sage Publications, a major publisher of academic materials.  I pointed out in Appendix I "Optimizing the Fairness of Student Evaluations" has by 2016 been cited in 61 refereed professional journal articles in several academic disciplines, proving the article has been read and used by serious researchers and educators. 

I told readers in Appendix I of Born to Learn they could access a free PDF copy of "Optimizing the Fairness of Student Evaluations" by clicking on this web address, http://www.sagepub.com/holt/articles/Stapleton.pdf.  Unfortunately this is no longer possible if you enter the address through a search engine.  I clicked on the address today (July 11, 2016) going to it through Google and the page could not be found. 

You can find any number of results, citations, and web addresses for "Optimizing the Fairness of Student Evaluations" by punching Optimizing the Fairness of Student Evaluations into Google or any browser, but, alas, you can no longer find a free PDF copy on the web, or at least I could not using a browser.  You can find addresses verifying the number of citations, now 61, by punching Optimizing the Fairness of Student Evaluations into Google, and you can find a PDF copy at Sage Pubs, at http://jme.sagepub.com/content/25/3/269.full.pdf+html, for $36, over twice what a print copy of Born to Learn costs.  You may be able to get a free copy of Optimizing the Fairness of Student Evaluations if you can login at the Sage Pubs website with an institutional password.  I have no idea why Sage Pubs provided a free PDF copy for 15 years on the Internet and then took it down, or if got taken down by accident someway.  On the other hand you can find print copies of the Journal of Management Education in libraries, but, alas, few readers will take the time to look the article up in a library.

Consequently, I decided today (July 11, 2016) to add another page to our Effective Learning Company website called Games Educators Play on which I re-published a case "Games Educators Play" I published in Business Voyages, another book I wrote offered for sale on the Effective Learning Publications page of this website, which covers in some detail the research, reasoning, findings, substantiations, and recommendations in Appendix I of Born to Learn, including a recommendation that academic departments and schools use a CITP, a Composite Indicator of Teaching Productivity, to evaluate teachers.  The CITP is a metric I invented that measures the productivity of a teacher by weighting equally instructor excellence, study production, learning production, and relative expected grades as variables taken from computerized student evaluation forms used for evaluating teachers.

"Optimizing the Fairness of Student Evaluations" is thirty-three pages long and contains numerous exhibits, charts, graphs, diagrams, statistical significance tests, correlation coefficients, and the like substantiating the findings.  The article provides hard evidence, proof some say, that teachers can in some cases increase their student evaluation scores and their merit raises by lowering the requirements and grading standards of their courses, by dumbing them down and teaching to easy tests. 

Using a CITP, a Composite Indicator of Teaching Productivity, in the department or school will eliminate this possibility and optimize fairness for all teachers in the department or school.  Most teachers are just like most people in any vocation or profession.  They like to be recognized for doing a good job and want to be fairly rewarded based on their relative productivity and contributions.  The CITP will insure this happens.

Read the Games Educators Play page on this website now to see how the CITP works and why it should be used.  I regret that Optimizing the Fairness of Student Evaluations is no longer easily available free on the web as I said it was in Appendix I of Born to Learn.  If you know someone who bought and read a copy of Born to Learn please tell him or her to read this website page.

These issues are discussed to some degree in all my books offered for sale on this website on the Effective Learning Publications page.  Business Voyages covers the CITP in more detail than Born to Learn or Recommendations for Waking Up From the America Nightmare.  On the other hand, Born to Learn provides a more comprehensive coverage of transactional analysis (TA) concepts and techniques, showing how they apply to specifics such as teaching methods, classroom layouts, testing and grading methods, student motivation, classroom management, and learning contracts.  

POST POSTSCRIPT

HOW TO ESTIMATE THE PRODUCTIVITY OF TEACHERS AND LEARNERS


While it is still impossible to find a copy of Optimizing the Fairness of Student Evaluations using search engines on the Internet, by sheer luck as I was reading an old post of mine on the Internet in December 2016 I came across a link to the full text article as linked below.  I clicked on the web address and lo and behold up the article popped, as if by magic, as if resurrected from the dead.  I by no means fully understanding how this linking business works on the Internet.  Regardless, here it is in its full glory for your edification.  Enjoy.

Check out “Optimizing the fairness of student evaluations:  A study of correlations between instructor excellence, study production, learning production, and effective grades,” by Stapleton & Murkison, published in 2001 in the Journal of Management Education, by the Organizational Behavior Teaching Society, using Sage Publications.  This article presents a new metric, the CITP, the Composite Indicator of Teaching Productivity, which has now been cited in sixty-one refereed professional journal articles in several disciplines, from physics to psychology.

https://studysites.sagepub.com/holt/articles/Stapleton.pdf

Published in 2001 by the Organizational Behavior Teaching Society in the Journal of Management Education, this article shows how difficult it is to fairly evaluate teaching and learning and why relative expected grades questions should always be included on student evaluation forms to provide a modicum of fairness.

To verify the 61 citations just punch Optimizing the Fairness of Student Evaluations into Google and read the sources.

Optimizing the Fairness of Student Evaluations gets to the heart of intractable problems of the teaching profession, the most serious of which is probably teacher evaluations. How can you or a teacher know how well a teacher is doing his/her job? What sort of criteria can you use for making this judgment? Certainly the purpose of teaching is to cause learning to occur in students, but how do you measure this? What kind of learning? How much learning? How much learning relative to what? What percentage of a prescribed content or syllabus a teacher causes students to memorize? Or how much learning a teacher produces in students relative to how much peer teachers produce? In other words are you attempting to measure absolute learning or relative learning?

Optimizing the Fairness of Student Evaluations presents a unique Composite Indicator of Teaching Productivity (CITP), one of the most sophisticated metrics of teaching productivity yet developed in the teacher evaluation literature.

Check it out at

http://www.sagepub.com/holt/articles/Stapleton.pdf







 



 












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